Steve Stark | About

I grew up on the St. Lawrence River in Ogdensburg, New York.  The river serves as the border between the US and Canada and is the main thoroughfare for ships traveling from the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes.  It's a rural area located near the Thousand Islands and about a 2-hour drive from the Adirondack Mountains.  Most of my childhood was spent enjoying the outdoors. 

 

My photography career started in 1981, the year I graduated from Brooks Institute of Photography.   I started working for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at the Nevada Test Site.  I was a staff photographer for 2 years and then managed the Photography Department for another 10.  I then transferred to the main lab in Livermore, CA and spent my remaining 13 years serving as their IT Manager in Nevada.

 

After retiring from the LLNL in 2007, I immersed myself back into nature photography on a full-time basis.  I did not look back at that point and wonder what might have been, I merely became excited about the future and where my photography might take me. The one belief I’ve always had from my Brooks days that hasn’t changed was that a photo of nature should represent the subject as close to its natural state as possible.

 

I moved to Colorado in 2012 and now live in Pagosa Springs.   I have spent most of my time traveling around Colorado capturing the beautiful landscapes and wildlife you see on this website.  I have utilized my knowledge of film and digital photography, along with my computer background, to produce these images.  I specialize in photography of nature with the hope that my images might help people appreciate the beauty of our natural world and realize that it needs to be protected for future generations.  Nature cannot protect itself.  It can only adapt to the stresses of our modern world.  The natural world is under more pressure than it has ever been and only we can save it for future generations to enjoy.  Lyndon B. Johnson once said, “If future generations are to remember us with gratitude rather than contempt, we must leave them something more than the miracles of technology.  We must leave them a glimpse of the world as it was created, not just as it looked when we got through with it.”  My wish is that my images in some small way help to make this happen.